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cnet:

iOS 6 adoption surges after release of Google Maps app
New data shows that since Google launched its iOS mapping application, there has been a 30 percent bump in people upgrading their devices to Apple’s newest mobile operating system.
Read more

This is a 30% bump in the rate at which people are upgrading, not the overall install base. Overstating the facts here.

cnet:

iOS 6 adoption surges after release of Google Maps app

New data shows that since Google launched its iOS mapping application, there has been a 30 percent bump in people upgrading their devices to Apple’s newest mobile operating system.

Read more

This is a 30% bump in the rate at which people are upgrading, not the overall install base. Overstating the facts here.

Jun 6

The future is iCloudy

There are several possibly answers to the question of what iCloud, Apple’s soon-to-be-announced “cloud” service, actually is. For sure, we’ll know soon enough, but it’s fun to speculate.

The front-runners seem to be:

  • it’s a music streaming service, that will allow you to play any music you own no matter what device you’re currently using
  • it’s an über-sync service that will mirror all your documents and settings across all your devices.
  • it’s a replacement for iTunes inasmuch as instead of syncing your iDevices to your Mac or PC you’ll sync them to the iCloud service instead
  • it’s actually an updated version of the Time Capsule and Airport Extreme routers, which will allow them to act as sync points for your iDevices. This is a lot like the former point, except you’re syncing to a local device instead of something ‘out there’ on the internet

I actually think that these are all likely to be true - at least in part.

The music streaming service is something that people seem to have been clamouring for, and Amazon and Google have recently launched similar services. I’m not convinced by this idea at all - it may fly in an world of unmetered high speed internet service, but where I live I certainly don’t want to be using up my limited monthly bandwidth allowance to listen to music that I already have on my computer or on a CD on the shelf. But I think there’s enough of an argument for the convenience factor of instantly accessing your iTunes purchases to make almost certainly a feature of iCloud.

The integrated sync service is something that iOS has been desperately in need of ever since the iWork apps launched on iPad. The very first hurdle most users hit is ‘how do I get my documents on it’ ? None of the current answers to that question have proven satisfactory. Dropbox has proven that utility of a transparent cloud sync service that’s well executed - Apple’s own iDisk feature beat Dropbox to market by many years, but always feels clunky and slow in comparison. I’m betting on a Dropbox-like update to iDisk, re-branded under the iCloud banner, that will provide transparent syncing of all your files across all your iDevices.

The utility of a sync service goes beyond just syncing documents though. MobileMe currently provides pretty robust push sync of calendar appointments and contacts (although often criticised, I’ve always found MobileMe sync to work very well). It’s obvious that this feature would be retained under iCloud, but I get the feeling it’s going to go further. There have been rumours for a long while now about a ‘portable home folder’ feature in Mac OS X Lion that will allow you to log in to any Mac using your Apple ID, and mirror your personal documents to that machine. I think that home folder mirroring will be a part of iCloud and Mac OS X Lion

But that’s not all: iOS developers need a way to sync application-specific data stores across all your devices. At the moment, the only solution for this is the hard one - roll your own. I think iOS 5 will include a robust sync service over iCloud for iOS (and Mac OS) apps.

The third idea in the list above is that iCloud will replace the need to connect a new iOS device to iTunes before you can use it. At the moment, using an iOS device requires you to have a Mac or PC that runs a recent version of iTunes. This is no trivial requirement, even for the tech savvy. Far better to be able to take your shiny new iPhone out of the box, power it on and enter your Apple ID (or sign up for one) and - like magic - your apps and contacts and music and… get mirrored from the iCloud. Android already features this kind of setup via Google, and it’s probably the best single feature of that platform. I think cloud syncing will replace iTunes for iOS devices.

The final idea is that iCloud will actually be some feature of the (excellent) Airport Extreme and Time Capsule routers. I have thought for some time that Apple needed to add iTunes sharing to these devices instead of requiring users to have their computers on and running iTunes full time in order to access media. But if iCloud is a true cloud service then requiring a hardware device that sits in your home in order to work doesn’t really make sense. Certainly, I can’t really see all 100 million plus iOS device owners running out to buy - and then configure - an new Airport router just to use iCloud. Also, this would only work whist you were in your home and on your Airport network.

Instead, I think that the Airport routers will get an upgrade - and hopefully a firmware upgrade for existing units - that enables them to work as a local cache of your iCloud data. This will be an optional, additional feature of iCloud for Airport owners. In effect, you’ll sync with your Airport, and the device will then sync with iCloud in it’s own time. This removes the bottleneck of waiting to download your media over the internet, and the potential cost. It may be that certain media can only be synced to the router (ie. music that isn’t from iTunes), because of licence restrictions from the record and movie companies.

What the end result of these features should be is an effortless, transparent sync service that allows you to setup and use a brand new iOS device without ever needing to connect it to your computer, nor even worry about where your documents are physically stored. Getting this right is certainly going to be tricky, and I hope we can avoid the teething troubles of MobileMe - that’s why iOS developers are going to be watching the WWDC keynote with a great deal of interest.

Jun 5

I would have expected the BBC #coast team to at least know where Dover is !

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My 2yr old was was on TV today, with me and her grandad !

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Apple & Samsung – There’s Much the same between U and I

Mobile Orchard: Apple & Samsung – There’s Much the same between U and I:

"Samsung’s designers either got lazy or accidentally hit copy when they meant to press ‘create derivative’."
This is the nub of it - Samsung copied the design, the look and the feel. I’m all for innovation - and this ain’t it.
Apr 8
ruineshumaines:

New Born Polar Bear (by emptysound)

WARNING: engage cuteness filter before viewing !

ruineshumaines:

New Born Polar Bear (by emptysound)

WARNING: engage cuteness filter before viewing !

Apr 8

QuickPick Kicked out of the App Store

rentzsch:

Seth Willits / @sethwillits:

QuickPick is being kicked out of the App Store.

It doesn’t matter that QuickPick existed years before Launchpad.

Rejected.

Period.

QuickPick is Seth’s application and document launcher. Apple has apparently decided to remove/retroactively-reject QuickPick as being too similar to 10.7’s Launchpad.

At least it’s an Mac app, and therefore he can revert to a more traditional sales channel such as selling it via his website. If it were an iOS app however, he’d be shit out of luck.

Apr 4
crookedindifference:

2012: The last year of the wild Bluefin Tuna

For millennia, mankind has fished for the Bluefin. Some of the  traditional fishing techniques are still being used today. But  commercial fishing techniques were launched in the Fifties. Ever since,  Bluefin tuna stocks have been reduced by 97%.

A new website wants you to know how grim the situation has become for Atlantic bluefin.

Chances are that the last wild Bluefin tuna will die in 2012. If the  Bluefin becomes extinct, it could have a major impact on the fragile  ecosystems of our oceans.

If you live in an EU nation, it’s  worth your contacting your country’s responsible ministry to ask what they are doing to help avoid the extinction of one of the oceans noblest  creatures. Also, its critically important to reject bluefin at the market level, particularly in sushi restaurants, to help reduce demand.
Watch the video to learn about the Bluefin’s biggest problems, including economies of  extinction (when an exploited species becomes ever more valuable, the  rarer it gets), tragedy of the commons , bycatch,  subsidies and the wasteful nature of feeding cultured predatory  fishes.
Further readings: the Bluefin tuna on Wikipedia, “The Bluefin Bonanza” by Wietse van der Werf, website of ICCAT, website of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)

crookedindifference:

2012: The last year of the wild Bluefin Tuna

For millennia, mankind has fished for the Bluefin. Some of the traditional fishing techniques are still being used today. But commercial fishing techniques were launched in the Fifties. Ever since, Bluefin tuna stocks have been reduced by 97%.

A new website wants you to know how grim the situation has become for Atlantic bluefin.

Chances are that the last wild Bluefin tuna will die in 2012. If the Bluefin becomes extinct, it could have a major impact on the fragile ecosystems of our oceans.

If you live in an EU nation, it’s worth your contacting your country’s responsible ministry to ask what they are doing to help avoid the extinction of one of the oceans noblest creatures. Also, its critically important to reject bluefin at the market level, particularly in sushi restaurants, to help reduce demand.

Watch the video to learn about the Bluefin’s biggest problems, including economies of extinction (when an exploited species becomes ever more valuable, the rarer it gets), tragedy of the commons , bycatch, subsidies and the wasteful nature of feeding cultured predatory fishes.

Further readings: the Bluefin tuna on Wikipedia, “The Bluefin Bonanza” by Wietse van der Werf, website of ICCAT, website of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES)

Apr 4

Critical Error

  • Cold caller: I'm calling regarding a critical error report we've received from your computer
  • Me: (knowing a thing or two about my computer, not least the fact it's a Mac) OK. Could you tell me your name and telephone number please ?
  • Cold caller: …….>click<…brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Zite smacked down

This sucks - Zite is a great app, and through it I’ve discovered web sites that I never knew existed, visited them, and even subscribed to their RSS feeds. When will publishers wake up and realise the benefit of apps like this ?